In the News

In the News

Mahnaz Afkhami has been featured in the news in print media, social media, and on television and radio.

Mahnaz Afkhami Interview, Anne Petrie’s Talk TV, CBC Newsworld

Author : Anne Petrie, The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)

Mahnaz Afkhami discusses the stereotypes of Muslims and Muslim women commonly presented by the Western media. She notes that women in Muslim societies have a wide variety of experiences depending on the context, and expressions of Muslim feminism are a response to indigenous cultural conditions. Afkhami responds to questions from the host and from the …


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On Religion With Mahnaz Afkhami

Author : Liane Hansen, NPR Interviews

Dr. Mahnaz Afkhami, the executive director of the Sisterhood Is Global Institute, talks with Liane Hansen about the restricted role of women in Islam. Dr. Afkhami says the problem of a woman’s place in Muslim countries is not rooted in the religion, but in the patriarchal structures of society. Mahnaz Afkhami: Professional women participating in …


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Voice of Conscience: Impassioned Author Lobbies for Rights of Muslim Women

Author : Marilyn Silverstein, The Jewish Exponent

Mahnaz Afkhami shares a certain sisterhood with the Queen of Hearts in Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland — a woman who thought nothing of believing as many as six impossible things before breakfast. “To believe the impossible is possible is the first step in making it so,” said Afkhami, executive director of the Sisterhood Is …


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Muslim Feminist Comments on Women in Islam

Author : Liane Hansen, NPR Weekend Edition

Liane Hansen, Host: This past week in Washington, the nation’s Catholic bishops debated and discussed the role of women in the church. It’s the first major conference of church leaders since Pope John Paul II last May formally outlawed the concept of women as priests. Bishop John Snyder [sp] headed one of the conference committees. …


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Cutting Edge of the Islamic Revolution

Author : Amy E. Schwartz, The Washington Post

Taslima Nasrin may not be “the female Salman Rushdie,” but the two besieged Muslim-born writers have more in common than the obvious (either could be killed at any moment by bounty hunters) or the quirky (each, for some reason, has written a novel called “Shame”). They also share considerable abilities to predict the near future. …


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